Posts Tagged ‘impact’

The list of STMA-supported research publications from West Africa for the year 2019 is out

Posted on News, Press room, Published Journals, Research News, Seed System Publication, West Africa News, West Africa Publications, November 30, 2019

Melaku Gedil and Abebe Menkir. 2019. An Integrated Molecular and Conventional Breeding Scheme for Enhancing Genetic Gain in Maize in Africa. Published in Frontiers. Plant Sciences and accessible here

Adu, G. B., Badu-Apraku, B., Akromah, R., Garcia-Oliveira, A. L., Gedil, M., Awuku, F. J. 2019. Genetic diversity and population structure of early-maturing tropical maize inbred lines using SNP markers, published  in PloS ONE, volume 14, number 4 and accessible here  

Badu-Apraku, B., Talabi, A. O., Fakorede, M., Fasanmade, Y., Gedil, M., Magorokosho, C., Asiedu, R. 2019. Yield gains and associated changes in an early yellow bi-parental maize population following genomic selection for Striga resistance and drought tolerance, published in BMC Plant Biology, volume 19, number 129, and accessible here.

Bankole, F., Menkir, A., Olaoye , G.*, Olakojo, O.*, Gedil, M. 2019. Association studies between grain yield and agronomic traits of a MARS maize (Zea mays L.) population under drought and non-stress condition, published in Acta Agriculturae Slovenica, volume 114, and accessible here.

Kammo, E. Q., Suh, C., Mbong, G. A., Djomo, S. H., Chimi, N. L. L., Mbeungang, D. L., Mafouasson, H. A., Meseka, S. K. and Menkir, A. 2019. Biological versus chemical control of fall armyworm and Lepidoptera stem borers of maize (Zea mays), published in Agronomie Africaine, volume 31, number 2, and accessible here.

Kolawole, A. O., Menkir, A., Blay, E., Ofori, K. and Kling, J. G., 2019. Changes in heterosis of maize (Zea mays L.) varietal cross hybrids after four cycles of reciprocal recurrent selection, published in Cereal Research Communications, volume 47, number 1, and accessible here .

Sangare, A., Menkir, A., Ofori, K. and Gracen, V., 2019. Studies on estimation of heterosis for striga resistance in maize test crosses in Mali, published in Journal of Genetics, Genomics & Plant Breeding, volume 3, number 3, and accessible here

Akaogu, I. C., Badu-Apraku, B., Tongoona, P., Ceballos, H., Gracen, V. E., Offei, S. and Dzidzienyo, D. 2019. Inheritance of Striga hermonthica adaptive traits in an early-maturing white maize inbred line containing resistance genes from Zea diploperennis. published in Plant Breeding, and accessible here  

Annor, B., Badu-Apraku, B., Nyadanu, D., Akromah, R. and Fakorede, M. 2019. Testcross performance and combining ability of early maturing maize inbreds under multiple-stress environments, published in NATURE Scientific Reports, volume 9, and accessible here .

Nelimor, C., Badu-Apraku, B., Nguetta, S. P., Tetteh, A. Y. and Garcia-Oliveira, A. L. 2019. Phenotypic characterization of maize landraces from Sahel and Coastal west Africa reveals marked diversity and potential for genetic improvement, published in Journal of Crop Improvement, and accessible here .

Obeng-Bio, E., Badu-Apraku, B., Ifie, B. E., Danquah, A., Blay, E. and Annor, B. 2019. Genetic analysis of grain yield and agronomic traits of early provitamin A quality protein maize inbred lines in contrasting environments,  published in The Journal of Agricultural Science, and accessible here.

Nelimor, C., Badu-Apraku, B., Tetteh, A. Y.* and Nguetta, A. S. 2019. Assessment of genetic diversity for drought, heat and combined drought and heat stress tolerance in early maturing maize landraces, published in Plants, volume 8, and accessible here.

Badu-Apraku, B., Fakorede, M., Talabi, A. O., Oyekunle, M., Aderounmu, M., Lum, A. F., Ribeiro, P. F., Adu, G. B. and Toyinbo, J. O. 2019. Genetic studies of extra-early provitamin-A maize inbred lines and their hybrids in multiple environments, published in Crop Science, and accessible here.  

Badu-Apraku, B. and Akinwale, R. O. 2019. Biplot analysis of line X tester data of maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines under stress and nonstress environments. Published in Cereal Research Communications, volume 47, number 3, and accessible here.

Oyinbo, O., Mbavai, J. J., Shitu, M. B., Kamara, A., Abdoulaye, T. and Ugbabe, O. O. 2019. Sustaining the beneficial effects of maize production in Nigeria: does adoption of short season maize varieties matter?  Published in Experimental Agriculture, and accessible here  

Kadjo, D., Ricker-Gilbert, J., Shively, G. and Abdoulaye, T. 2019. Food safety and adverse selection in rural maize markets. Published in Journal of Agricultural Economics, and accessible here .

Assfaw Wossen, T., Alene, A., Abdoulaye, T., Feleke, S. and Manyong, V. 2019. Agricultural technology adoption and household welfare: measurement and evidence, published in Food Policy, and accessible here  

Impact of adoption of drought-tolerant maize varieties on total maize production in south Eastern Zimbabwe

Posted on , November 17, 2019

Drought is a huge limiting factor in maize production, mainly in the rain-fed agriculture of sub-Saharan Africa. In response to this threat, drought-tolerant (DT) maize varieties have been developed with an aim to ensure maize production under mild drought conditions.

We conducted a study to assess the impact of smallholder farmers’ adoption of DT maize varieties on total maize production. Data for the study came from a survey of 200 randomly sampled households in two districts of Chiredzi and Chipinge in southeastern Zimbabwe.

The study found that 93% of the households were growing improved maize varieties and that 30% of the sampled households were growing DT maize varieties. Total maize yield was 436.5 kg/ha for a household that did not grow DT maize varieties and 680.5 kg/ha for households that grew DT maize varieties.

We control for the endogeneity of the DT adoption variable, by using the control function approach to estimate total maize production in a Cobb–Douglas model. The results show that households that grew DT maize varieties had 617 kg/ha more maize than households that did not grow the DT maize varieties. Given that almost all farmers buy their seeds in the market, a change in varieties to DT maize seeds gives an extra income of US$240/ha or more than nine months of food at no additional cost.

This has huge implications in curbing food insecurity and simultaneously saving huge amounts of resources at the household and national levels, which are used to buy extra food during the lean season.

Productivity and production risk effects of adopting drought-tolerant maize varieties in Zambia

Posted on , November 16, 2019

Productivity and production risks affect the use of agricultural production practices and inputs, particularly in developing countries. This paper aims to investigate the effects of adopting drought-tolerant maize varieties (DTMVs) on farm productivity,yield variance and downside risk exposure of maize growing households of Zambia.

The study revealed that DTMV adoption increases maize yield by 15 per cent and reduces the risk of crop failure : reducing yield variance by 38 percent and exposure to downside risk by 36 percent.

This study establishes the benefits of DTMV adoption in Zambia with regards to productivity, yield stability and downside risk in the face of climate change. Results from this study underscore the need for more concerted efforts to scale-out DTMVs for both maize productivity enhancement and for risk mitigation against weather shocks.

 

Resilience and livelihoods improved for 3.5 million African farmers now planting stress tolerant maize varieties

Posted on annual meetings, Media&Stories, News, News & Media, News & Stories, Press room, Southern Africa News, May 24, 2019

The Stress Tolerant Maize for Africa (STMA) project held its annual meeting May 7-9, 2019 in Lusaka, Zambia to discuss the achievements of the past year and priorities going forward.

Farmer participatory evaluation of STMA hybrids compared to popular varietis

STMA Project Leader Cosmos Magoroksho recalled what STMA project launched in 2016 is aiming at “Maize is grown on 30 million hectares in SSA, and more than 208 million farmers depend on it as a staple crop. However, average maize yields in SSA are among the lowest in the world. STMA is a multi-stakeholder project designed to develop, test and deliver improved maize varieties that can mitigate the combined effects of multiple stresses in farmer fields and provide reliable decent yields even in challenging conditions like drought or low soil fertility.”

“STMA proved it is possible to combine multiple stress tolerance and still get good yields. One of the greatest aspects of STMA are great partnerships which have only grown stronger through the years. We are now the proud partners of over 100 seed companies,” said B.M. Prasanna, director of the CIMMYT Global Maize Program and the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE), in his keynote address. 

CIMMYT and partners across SSA are working together in the fight against challenges such as drought, maize lethal necrosis (MLN) and fall armyworm (FAW) using innovative technologies such as doubled haploids, marker assisted back crossing, and germplasm screening to develop improved stress tolerant maize for farmers. The efforts are paying off—in 2018, 3.5 million smallholder farmers planted stress tolerant maize varieties in 10 African countries, Prasanna said.

STMA Annual review participants visited ZAMSEED – Lusaka 8 May 2019

On May 8, participants visited local seed company partners, namely Afriseed, Zamseed and QualiBasic Seed to learn more about the opportunities and challenges of producing stress tolerant maize seed for smallholder farmers. Afriseed CEO Stephanie Angomwile discussed her business strategy and passion for agriculture with participants. She expressed her gratitude for the support CIMMYT has provided the company, including access to drought tolerant maize varieties as well as capacity development opportunities for her staff.

At QualiBasic Seeds (QBS), CIMMYT staff and partners were given the opportunity to learn and ask questions about the seed multiplication process in Zambia and the importance of high quality, genetically pure foundation seeds for seed companies.

Bhola Nath Verma, principal crop breeder at ZAMSEED explained climate change has visible impact on Zambian maize sector as the main maize growing basket moved 500 km North due to increased drought. Verma values the partnership with STMA as he can source very drought-tolerant breeding material from CIMMYT and IITA allowing him to develop very early varieties that escape drought and bring much needed yield stability to farmers in Zambia, Angola, DRC, Botswana and Tanzania.

Maize Youth Innovators 2019

The meeting concluded with an awards ceremony for the winners of the 2019 MAIZE Youth Innovators Awards – Africa, established by MAIZE in collaboration with the Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD). These awards recognize the contributions of young women and men below 35 years of age who are implementing innovations in African maize-based agri-food systems, including research-for-development, seed systems, agribusiness, and sustainable intensification. This is the second year of the award, and the first time it has been held in Africa. Winners include Hildegarde Dukunde of Rwanda and Mila Lokwa Giresse of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the change agent category, Admire Shayanowako of the Republic of South Africa and Ismael Mayanja of Uganda in the research category, and Blessings Likagwa of Malawi in the farmer category.

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